OC Panel Discusses the Opportunities and Challenges Women Face in Business

On Jan. 14, 2015, panelists discussed, “Do Women Leaders Think Differently Than Men in Business?”. From left to right are, CEO of Critical Mass Radio Richard Franzi; Tomilee Gill of Executives Unlimited Inc.; Darcie Harris of EWF International; France Dixon Helfer ’78; and John Bradley Jackson, director of Mihaylo’s Center for Entrepreneurship.

On Jan. 14, 2015, panelists discussed, “Do Women Leaders Think Differently Than Men in Business?”. From left to right are, CEO of Critical Mass Radio Richard Franzi; Tomilee Gill of Executives Unlimited Inc.; Darcie Harris of EWF International; France Dixon Helfer ’78; and John Bradley Jackson, director of Mihaylo’s Center for Entrepreneurship.

A panel of three prominent female entrepreneurs and Mihaylo’s John Bradley Jackson, head of the Center for Entrepreneurship, discussed the opportunities and challenges facing women in the business world. The discussion, held on Jan. 14, was moderated by Richard Franzi and broadcast on OC Talk Radio’s “Critical Mass.”

Women comprise a large and growing percentage of business entrepreneurs in America today. “Twenty-nine percent of non-farm businesses in the U.S. are owned by women, contributing $1.2 trillion to the economy,” says John Bradley Jackson, head of Mihaylo’s Center for Entrepreneurship. He notes, “7.8 million women own businesses in the U.S., and one in eleven or twelve women could be described as entrepreneurial.” While only four percent of the CEOs of large corporations are women, significantly underrepresenting the demographic, that figure is rising steadily. By 2040, it is estimated that one-third of American corporations will be headed by female executives.

Jackson and a panel of three female entrepreneurs, Tomilee Gill of Executives Unlimited Inc., France Dixon Helfer ’78, a CSUF biological sciences alumna, healthcare entrepreneur and executive advisor; and Darcie Harris, founder and CEO of EWF International and the Alpha Mare Academy, explored the opportunities and challenges women face in the business world, particularly in management and entrepreneurial positions, during the “Do Women Leaders Think Differently than Men in Business?” discussion on Jan. 14 at Mihaylo’s O’Brien Center.

Richard Franzi, CEO of Critical Mass for Business, which produces the “Critical Mass” radio program on OC Talk Radio, moderated the discussion, which was broadcast on radio, YouTube and podcast.

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Mihaylo Professor Welcomes New Graduate Students with Tips for Success in School and Beyond

Mihaylo Management Professor Gerard Beenen discusses his graduate student career typology

Mihaylo Management Professor Gerard Beenen discusses his graduate student career typology

Mihaylo Management Professor Gerard Beenen advises incoming spring 2015 graduate students on how to succeed in their academic programs and future careers.

The incoming graduate students for the spring 2015 semester at Mihaylo will soon join the 191,571 students who receive business graduate degrees in the United States each year. Business graduate degrees now comprise 26% of the nation’s graduate degrees awarded, beating out education masters degrees for first place. Mihaylo’s incoming students heard from professors and academic advisors at the Mihaylo Graduate Programs Welcome Seminar on Jan. 16. Among the speakers were Mihaylo Management Professor Gerard Beenen, who teaches courses in organizational behavior and leadership.

“Graduate school is more unstructured, involves more critical thinking and more analysis” when compared to undergraduate courses, Beenen explains. “You are in charge of your own learning in graduate school.”

Being proactive is the key to success in graduate school. This involves building relationships and seeking feedback on one’s performance. Being proactive is achieved through three pillars:

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Laptops and iPads or Notebook and Pencil: Does High-Tech or Low-Tech Help Academic Performance?


JHILLPHOTO-95Tal Gross, assistant professor at Columbia University, wrote in an opinion piece for The Washington Post that he has resolved to ban laptops from his classroom in 2015, believing it causes distraction and hurts student performance. A Mihaylo professor and undergraduate student share their views on this controversial subject.

In most college courses, a majority of the students spend the lecture working on their laptops or iPads. While sometimes used for note-taking, these high-tech gadgets are often used to browse the internet, check social media or send emails to friends. Tal Gross, assistant professor for health policy and management at Columbia University, explained in an opinion piece for The Washington Post on Dec. 30, 2014 that he has decided to ban laptops from his classes in 2015, harking back to the era of pencils and paper note taking.

“Since most students can type very quickly, laptops encourage them to copy down nearly everything said in the classroom,” Gross wrote. “But when students stare at the screen of their laptops, something is lost. The students shift from being intellectuals, listening to one another, to being customer-service representatives, taking down orders. Class is supposed to be a conversation, not an exercise in dictation.”

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAGross points to recent research that shows that students taking notes via paper and pencil score much higher on examinations than students that take notes on their laptops. This research further reveals that when a student uses a laptop during a lecture, nearby students are also distracted. Among these studies is the report “In-class laptop use and its effects on student learning” by Winona State University psychology professor Carrie B. Fried. That report notes that “students who used laptops in class spent considerable time multitasking and that laptop use posed a significant distraction to both users and fellow students.”

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Addiction to Social Media Networks: What Students Need to Know

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Social media platforms, such as Facebook, provide up-to-date, accessible and personalized communication, yet they also have the potential to become addictive. Mihaylo Professor Ofir Turel discusses how to use social media constructively.

A 2012 survey of CSUF students conducted by Mihaylo Professor Ofir Turel revealed a campus community well-connected to social media platforms such as Facebook. Survey participants reported that they added an average of 7.53 Facebook friends per week, added two updates per day to their Facebook pages and spent an average of 1.89 hours per day on Facebook.

“Any application that provides variable and strong rewards and is regularly accessible is potentially addictive,” says Turel, an information systems and decision sciences professor. “With social media, you never know what friends have posted, so it encourages regular use.” However, he notes that the accessibility and rewards of social media use do not necessarily equate to addictive behaviors, as only a certain percentage of individuals are susceptible to addiction-like symptoms.

Mihaylo ISDS Professor Ofir Turel

Mihaylo ISDS Professor Ofir Turel

For those that do develop addictive symptoms, there can be serious negative results. “Such ‘addictions’ can result in academic failure, sleep deprivations, social isolation, health issues and many other impairments for adolescents and young adults; they can also result in reduced work performance and marital discord and separation for adults,” Turel and four other professors wrote in the 2014 study, Examination of Neural Systems Sub-serving Facebook ‘Addiction’. The study noted that research generally shows that between 0.7% and 11% of the population are strongly impacted by Internet-based addictive tendencies.

While there is no set criteria for what constitutes excessive or addictive use of social media platforms, Turel explains that use that severely interferes with other important priorities, such as school or work, is a warning sign of addiction. “If you use social media even though you know you need to be studying for an exam, the behavior is becoming unhealthy,” he says.

Turel notes that professional social networks, such as LinkedIn, and blogs generally do not result in addictive behaviors. “This is because the amount and variability of rewards are smaller, unlike the strong and unexpected social rewards users receive on networks such as Facebook,” he says.

For more information on social media and Internet addiction generally, consider taking this online test, a 20-question survey that measures the severity of addictive behaviors. Students may read Turel’s studies on technology addiction and information technology in the workplace here. They may also read a Live Science article featuring Turel’s studies.

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The Economies of Latin America: What Business Students Need to Know

Panorama of Rio de Janeiro, one of Latin America's iconic cities. Rio hosted the World Cup in 2014 and will host the Summer Olympics in 2016.

Panorama of Rio de Janeiro, one of Latin America’s iconic cities. Rio hosted the World Cup in 2014 and will host the Summer Olympics in 2016.

Taken as a whole, the nations of Latin America rank as the world’s fourth-largest economy, behind the U.S., China and the European Union. The region is particularly of interest to Southern California business students, who are only about 100 miles from the U.S./Mexico border, the northern boundary of Latin America. Mihaylo Economics Professor Denise Stanley discusses the Latin American economies and their impact on the business world.

Latin America, a broad and diverse region encompassing Mexico, Central America, South America and the Caribbean Islands, has a population of nearly 600 million people (twice the United States population) and taken as a whole would rank as the world’s fourth-largest economy, behind the U.S., China and the European Union.

Mihaylo Economics Professor Denise Stanley

Mihaylo economics professor Denise Stanley, who has taught ECON 334 – Economies of Latin America and the Caribbean for several years, tells students that the region survived the Great Recession better than the U.S. and Europe, yet faces some recent setbacks.

Based on gross domestic product (GDP), the standard economic measurement of national economies, Brazil ranks first in the region, with Mexico in second place. Yet Stanley notes that GDP per capita, which measures the economic well-being of the individual within the population, is a better measure of economic development. On that count, Chile ranks the highest in the region, followed by Uruguay and Argentina, not counting several small Caribbean Islands buoyed by tourism. The Western Hemisphere economy in the worst shape is French-speaking Haiti, victim of massive natural disasters, chronic poverty and political instability. Among Spanish-speaking nations, Nicaragua, Honduras and Bolivia fare the worst.“The region’s two biggest challenges are the state of the economies of the U.S., Europe and China, since many Latin American nations depend on exports, and oil dependency, which is a problem for several oil-producing nations as prices fall,” Stanley says. Yet she emphasizes that the diversity of the region makes generalization difficult. For example, the decline in oil prices could prove devastating for oil economies such as Venezuela, but it could result in stronger economic growth in some Central American nations that depend on oil imports.

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Mihaylo Students Develop Personal Elevator Pitches

Professor Atul Teckchandani

Professor Atul Teckchandani

Professor Atul Teckchandani helps business students develop an elevator pitch in a competition as part of his MGMT 340 – Organizational Behavior course.

The staff at Mihaylo Career Services refers to the personal elevator pitch, a 60 to 90-second personal summary that can open doors to employment or business partnerships and financing, as a “90-second commercial.” Atul Teckchandani, a Mihaylo assistant professor of management, helped his students develop their personal commercials through an elevator pitch competition this December.

“For the class, we focused on introducing oneself to a recruiter,” Teckchandani says. “But the basic format can be used to introduce oneself to anyone, at a networking event, work party or professional society meeting.”

“We are all overwhelmed with information and distractions. If you want to engage someone’s attention, you have a very brief period of time in which to do it. An effective one-to-two minute introduction can be a great way to make a strong first impression that can lead to additional interactions.”

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Latest Edition of Mihaylo Magazine Provides Snapshot of Business School

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Cover of the 2014 Mihaylo Magazine

The 2014 edition of the annual Mihaylo Magazine features news about faculty, student and alumni activities at the Mihaylo College of Business and Economics, including inspiring stories on alumni success and innovative teaching programs. The magazine also includes a demographic snapshot of the college.

Mihaylo finance alumna Theresa Fraijo ’08 and her husband, Robert, won the backing of billionaire entrepreneur Mark Cuban on ABC’s “Shark Tank” for their Veggie Mama business, which sells fruit-and -vegetable popsicles. In the classroom, a group of business students manage a $260,000 investment fund as part of the year-long Applied Securities Analysis Program (ASAP)Scott O’Brien ’77, a business administration-marketing alumnus, heads The Safariland Group, which manufactures bulletproof vests that have helped save the lives of more than 1,900 law enforcement officers.

These are among the many inspiring stories featured in the 2014 edition of the annual Mihaylo Magazine, which covers the activities and achievements of Mihaylo faculty, students and alumni. This year’s magazine also includes the biennial Dean’s Report, providing demographic profiles on the college’s graduate and undergraduate student populations, degree program statistics and a guide to the region’s business leaders who comprise the college’s diverse professional network.

The magazine also focuses on the school’s innovative hands-on academic programs, including the ASAP course, a new certificate program in health care analytics and international student collaboration between Mihaylo and university students in India via Skype.

To read Mihaylo Magazine in its entirety, view it online.

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Twin Brothers Give Business Students Formula for Career Success

James '14  (left) and Ryan '14  (right) Fratzke speak at the May 2014 commencement

James ’14 (left) and Ryan ’14 (right) Fratzke speak at the May 2014 commencement

Twin brothers and business marketing majors James ‘14 and Ryan Fratzke ’14 are now employed at Where 2 Get It, a marketing agency. On Nov. 18, the two shared strategies for career success beyond graduation with Mihaylo marketing capstone students.

An exciting and rewarding career after graduation is the dream of most business students. Twin brothers James ‘14 and Ryan Fratzke ’14, now employed at location-based digital marketing firm Where 2 Get It in Anaheim, presented a workshop to two marketing capstone courses on Nov. 18 on the top five principles for finding a job post-graduation.

Their presentation provided real-world examples and practical advice to help students realize their short-term and long-term career aspirations. They developed their formula through personal experience, participating in 36 job interviews since 2009.

With a resolve to give back to their alma mater, but lacking the means to provide financial gifts, the twins view their presentation as a way to support Mihaylo by sharing their experience and helping make current students’ post-college career searches easier. “As a proud CSUF graduate, I think paying it forward and giving back to the school is very important,” James told the Daily Titan“I think there is an opportunity here to share some school spirit and show students that staying involved with the school even after getting your degree, is the right thing to do.”

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Human Resource Professionals Share Leadership Secrets

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Richard Ramsay (left) and Jay Scott (right) discuss the book, Becoming a Person of Influence, by John C. Maxwell at the Mihyalo Leadership Scholars Program, Dec. 5, 2014. Professor Jay Barbuto, Mihaylo associate professor of organizational behavior and leadership, is center.

Jay Scott, vice president of human resources for the Anaheim Ducks and Honda Center and Richard Ramsay, vice president of human resources for Walt Disney International, share their leadership insights to the monthly Mihaylo Leadership Scholars Program meeting on Dec. 5.

“Whenever one talks about leadership, the first question is, ‘who is a leader,’” Richard Ramsay, vice president of human resources at Walt Disney International told Mihaylo students at the Leadership Scholars Program event on Dec. 5. “All of you can be leaders and have an impact on the world around you if you choose to.”

Ramsay and Jay Scott, vice president of human resources for H&S Ventures, which oversees the Anaheim Ducks hockey team and the Honda Center arena, gave a presentation to Mihaylo students at the December meeting of the Leadership Scholars Program. Ramsay and Scott have more than 60 years combined experience as business professionals specializing in human resources.

Ramsay joined Disney in 1980, working at the entertainment company as a part-time job while pursuing a college degree at Biola University. He has remained with the company for more than three decades.

“When you are thinking about where you want to work in the future, choose an individual or organization that matches your values,” said Ramsay, who also has a graduate degree from Chapman University.

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Mihaylo Professor Examines the ‘Dark Side’ of Information Technology

OfirTurel

Balancing technological gadgets, Professor Turel demonstrates information overload

Email, internet, social media, video games and in-car technologies are taken for granted in today’s society and certainly have a positive impact on our lives. However, they also have the potential for harmful consequences, including addiction, misuse, risky and deviant behaviors, information overload and stress. Mihaylo professor Ofir Turel discusses how we can maximize the positives and minimize the negatives of technology.

Ofir Turel co-authored a 2013 study, “The Dark Side of Information Technology Use,” which appeared in the Information Systems JournalThe study examines the potential for addiction, stress, information overload and disruption posed by modern information technology use. Turel, a professor of information systems and decision sciences, offers suggestions for individuals, students, employers and even technology manufacturers to minimize the possible negative aspects of technology use.

Based on various studies and publications in professional journals, Turel and his co-authors state in the report that, “people spend as much as 28 percent of their working time dealing with technology multi-tasking and 60 percent of users cannot go an hour without checking their email. An estimated 1.6 million vehicle accidents are related to mobile phone usage annually, while 50 to 70 percent of information security incidents are linked to misuse of technology by employees or other users.”

Individuals and employers should learn to recognize the warning signs of problems associated with the use of technology. “Warning signs regarding addiction for individuals include technology interfering with their normal lives, withdrawal symptoms when away from technology and a decline in face-to-face contact with live people,” says Turel. “Employers might notice deterioration in task quality, increased absenteeism and improper use of organizational information technologies and security issues,” he adds. “Many of us have strong inhibition abilities, controlling our desires to use technologies, but others find it very difficult to control their desires and enter the addiction segment.”

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