Category Archives: Patents

Daily Titan Covers Patent Talk at CSUF Startup Incubator

David Jafari 10 Rules Everyone Should Know About PatentsOn Wednesday, patent attorney and friend of the Center for Entrepreneurship and CSUF Startup Incubator David Jafari gave a great talk on patents titled: 10 Rules Everyone Should Know About Patents. David has given this talk in the classroom but this was the first time that he gave this talk at the CSUF Startup Incubator and two Daily Titan reporters were there to cover it.

Here is an excerpt from the Daily Titan story written up by Andrew Salmi:

Cal State Fullerton’s Center for Entrepreneurship hosted a discussion Wednesday at its CSUF Startup Incubator overviewing what up-and-coming entrepreneurs should know before pursuing a patent for their inventions.

The event featured David Jafari, a patent attorney licensed in Orange County who has been involved in intellectual property, business law and employment matters. With 17 years of experience, Jafari offered insight on patents and how to avoid making mistakes with them.

“It’s a property right that the government grants to the inventor of the idea that’s memorialized and claimed in that document. It’s a contract between the state and the inventor,” Jafari said.

You should really click on the link above to read the entire article that Priscilla Bui also contributed to. And make sure not to miss any of our other events and news by signing up for our weekly email update, the CSUF Entrepreneurship Insider.

Did you miss David’s excellent talk? You’re in luck! His entire presentation can be viewed in the video below.


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Patent It and Grow Rich! @ CSUF Startup Incubator

Today at 6pm at the CSUF Startup Incubator in Placentia we welcome patent attorney John Patent Attorney John Connors to speak at CSUF Startup IncubatorConnors to speak about patents and how they are a vitally important aspect of every startup, whether they know it or not. To get a ticket and please go to our event page.


Guiding Entrepreneurs, Inventors, and Developers through the Intellectual Property Minefield to Protect & Profit from Their Idea

The easiest thing to steal is an idea! But, there are legal ways to protect your intellectual property so that you become the next creator of the Miracle Mop, Snapchat, or Casper Mattress. Patent Attorney John J. Connors shares with audiences the often overlooked legal processes to get them protected, patented, and profiting from their idea!

Key Takeaways

Audiences appreciate John’s candor and first-hand experience when it comes to inventions. They walk away knowing how to:

  1. Invoke trade secret classifications early on to make sure your ideas aren’t stolen!
  2. Raise venture capital money without losing the rights to your app, invention, or product
  3. Differentiate between copyright, trademark, and patents laws so that you pursue legal protection correctly
  4. Recognize how patent, trademark, and copyright laws work together to strengthen your idea again copycats
  5. Obtain foreign intellectual property rights so that you’re covered outside of the United States
  6. Understand the nuances of the massive change in patent law that puts your invention in jeopardy of challenge

You can read more about John Conors here.


#CSUFEntrepreneur #CSUFStartup

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For more details on how we help people become entrepreneurs: http://bit.ly/csufstartup

Attend one of our entrepreneur events or sign up for a free mentoring session: http://bit.ly/CSUFEntrepreneurEvents

CSUF Patent Troll Seminar – Full Video

At this seminar, panelists Roger N. Behle (IP litigator at Foley, Bezek, Behle & Curtis, LLP), Jerry Conrey (Principal at Conrey Insurance Brokers) and Dr. Robert Kovacev (Professor of Finance at CSUF) discussed:

  • The role of a patent troll and how to identify one
  • Other intellectual property threats
  • Current and pending legislation designed to address patent trolling
  • Legal steps business owners should take when encountering a troll
  • Candidates for insurance protection

For more info, you can get in touch with us directly at csufentrepreneurship@fullerton­.edu

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Patent Trolls in the 19th Century?

Sharks in Iowa?

As strange as it sounds, “patent trolls” are not just a 21st century problem. It turns out this type of predator was also present in the late 1800s. Back then the trolls were called “patent sharks” and they were just as crafty as present day patent trolls.

Circa 1860 the US Patent Office made a decision to loosen up patent standards for designs of farm implements: plows, grain cradles, pitchforks, etc. This policy decision was met with a flurry of inferior and non-specific patents which then opened the door for the patent sharks.

The patent sharks would travel to isolated farm communities and threaten the farmers who were using the farm tools with the oblique patents. A quick cash settlement would normally avoid court. Sound familiar? The farmers protested to the Feds but little happened for about a decade. Later the US Patent Office returned to the higher patent standards that existed prior to the Civil War.

Lessons for the 21st Century? A good patent is a specific patent.  The Federal Government ain’t so smart. The small business man (the farmer of today) is the best prey for the troll. Bad guys follow the money.

Want to learn more about how to protect your small business or start up from the Patent Trolls? Come join CSUF Entrepreneurship at our seminar called:

Patent Trolls and Other IP-Related Threats:
How to Protect Your Business from a New Kind of Predator

Presented by: The CSUF Center for Entrepreneurship and CSUF Center for Family Business

Date: Wed., January, 22, 2014
Time: 6:00 p.m. (reception begins at 5:30 p.m.)
Location: Mihaylo College of Business and Economics
The O’Brien Center, Third Floor
800 N. State College Blvd., Fullerton

John Bradley Jackson
Director, Center for Entrepreneurship
jjackson@fullerton.edu

Top 10 Patent Troll Facts

  1. Apple is the number one patent troll victim with 171 patent troll lawsuits from 2009 to 2013.
  2. The number of patent suits filed by Patent Assertion Entities (Patent Trolls) has tripled in the last two years.
  3. Small and medium businesses represented 90% of the defendants sued.
  4. Patent litigation is very expensive; the average suit in which $1 million to $25 million is at stake costs $1.6 million through discovery and $2.8 million through trial.
  5. In 2013, three cases, tried before juries in separate districts, resulted in awards of $1 billion or greater. SOURCE
  6. Patent trolls have targeted the software industry with 41 percent of the patent litigation involving software patents. SOURCE
  7. Patent Trolls typically sue multiple defendants since this reduces their legal costs per defendant and makes for a large potential payoff. SOURCE
  8. Since 97 percent of infringement suits are settled before trial that suggests that, given the trolls’ advantages, target companies would rather pay off trolls than fight them in court. SOURCE
  9. The Patent Office receives 520,000 applications in a year — that’s about 1,425 every day — and its 6,500 inspectors are hard-pressed to investigate each application thoroughly. They sometimes end up issuing patents that should not have been awarded. The sheer number and poor quality of patents make it harder for technology companies to be sure they aren’t infringing on an existing or pending patent. SOURCE
  10. In 2011, United States business entities incurred $29 billion in direct costs because of patent trolls. SOURCE

For more information on Patent Trolling and how to combat them you should attend our event Patent Trolls and Other IP-Related Threats: How to Protect Your Business from a New Kind of Predator. REGISTER NOW!!!!

Patent Trolls: Who or What Are They Anyway?

So what exactly is a patent troll?

A patent troll can be a person or an entity who attempts to enforce or protect patent rights. Typically, the patent troll is on the hunt for patent infringers with the hope of stopping the infringement while collecting money. This pursuit may include a lawsuit or the threat of a lawsuit.

Patent trolls are often companies which own a portfolio of patents. Unique to the troll firm is a strategy to exploit existing users of the patents (i.e. infringers); this path is chosen instead of using the patents for traditional business use such as manufacturing.  The business model for the patent trolls is to make money by threatening or filing lawsuits

According to RPX Corporation, a firm that helps reduce company patent-litigation risk, patent trolls in 2012 filed more than 2,900 infringement lawsuits nationwide which nearly six times higher than the number in 2006. (Source: Wikipedia)

Some infringement threats can be described as being done in “bad faith” and may include a lack of specificity about the alleged infringement, extraordinary settlement demands and/or damage claims, and excessive licensing fees. Often these threats include impossibly short deadlines for payment.

The target or possible infringer can include companies that are large or small, with the small firms most unprepared to deal with the threats.  Smaller firms and startups are targeted because these firms are often undercapitalized and cannot afford the legal fees necessary to fight the troll. In practice, the smaller firms and startups choose to settle rather than fight.

The US Senate has been monitoring this situation and various pieces of legislation are under review to deal with the trolls. In the meantime, the patent troll thrives.

For more information on Patent Trolling and how to combat them you should attend our event Patent Trolls and Other IP-Related Threats: How to Protect Your Business from a New Kind of Predator. REGISTER NOW!!!!

John Bradley Jackson

Director

Center for Entrepreneurship

CSUF

Patent Trolls Are On the Hunt for Businesses Like Yours

If you think that patent trolling is an issue that affects only large corporations, think again. Small businesses like yours are often targeted by patent trolls, with threats of lawsuits and litigation.

Learn more about this threat at:

Patent Trolls and Other IP-Related Threats:
How to Protect Your Business from a New Kind of Predator

Presented by: The CSUF Center for Entrepreneurship and CSUF Center for Family Business

Date: Wed., January, 22, 2014
Time: 6:00 p.m. (reception begins at 5:30 p.m.)
Location: Mihaylo College of Business and Economics
The O’Brien Center, Third Floor
800 N. State College Blvd., Fullerton

At this seminar, panelists Roger N. Behle (IP litigator at Foley, Bezek, Behle & Curtis, LLP), Jerry Conrey (Principal at Conrey Insurance Brokers) and Dr. Robert Kovacev (Professor of Finance at CSUF) will discuss:

  • The role of a patent troll and how to identify one
  • Other intellectual property threats
  • Current and pending legislation designed to address patent trolling
  • Legal steps business owners should take when encountering a troll
  • Candidates for insurance protection

Arm yourself with the knowledge to avoid becoming a victim and combat this growing problem. Register now and reserve your space today. Questions can be directed to Adrienne Bailey at adbailey@fullerton.edu.

For more information on Patent Trolling and how to combat them you should attend our event Patent Trolls and Other IP-Related Threats: How to Protect Your Business from a New Kind of Predator. REGISTER NOW!!!!