Category Archives: John Bradley Jackson

Financing the Startup – CSUF Startup Incubator Event

Click to RSVP For the Financing the Startup Event

Click to RSVP For the Financing the Startup Event

Whenever we host an event at the CSUF Startup Incubator our goal is to educate all in attendance. After working with entrepreneurs for years I can safely say that the area of raising investment capital is one of those areas that entrepreneurs need the most education on.

Many of the entrepreneurs I have talked with think that they need to get funded by an Angel or a VC before they can start their company. That’s absolutely true for some companies and other companies will need investments along the way to fund growth. But the vast (vast, vast, vast, vast, vast…) majority of companies do not receive funding from Angels or VCs. As Director Jackson would put it, “That’s rarefied air.” That’s certainly true.

So, what is a budding entrepreneur to do? Fear not, we’re hosting an event this Wednesday at 6pm at the Incubator in Placentia that deals with this subject. Titled “Financing the Startup” (I think someone thought that it sounded like the movie title “Romancing the Stone” and that similarity was funny), Director John Bradley Jackson will give an overview of the financing landscape for startup entrepreneurs and provide some insights into how best to raise money.

This event, like all of our others (so far… we have to put that little bit in there for legal reasons, I think) will be free. Come and join us and maybe you’ll learn how to fund your startup! What do you have to lose?


More info on CSUF Center for Entrepreneurship:


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CSUF Campus Authors Recognized

150226 Socially Close - Book CoverAnd one of those authors was none other than Director John Bradley Jackson. Last year, Director Jackson published Socially Close: Social Media Marketing for Small Business, which is about how businesses should be using social media in their marketing campaigns.

Here’s a description of the book from Director Jackson’s website:

  • Frustrated with social media at your small business?
  • Confused by the stampede of new social networks and their ever-changing features?
  • Not getting the return on investment that you expected?

If that sounds familiar, then this is the book for you. For most small businesses, the promise of social media is to get found on the web, build brand awareness, create a dialog, nurture relationships, establish trust, and encourage people to buy your products and services. Making that promise a reality requires a vibrant social media strategy, an intimate knowledge of the brand, and a disciplined social media effort.

The title, “Socially Close”, describes the desired end-game of using social media. With so many choices on the web today, buyers are increasingly sophisticated and need more than a succinct description of your products and services. While it is true that the web provides some customers an auction like atmosphere with low price and quickest delivery, this type of customer relationship is short-lived since there is always a lower price or a quicker lead-time offered by a competitor.

It is my opinion that many customers prefer to establish a trust-based relationship with their providers. The customer who trusts your business is much more likely to do business with you again and to recommend you to others. This is the type of customer that you want to have a close relationship with and keep for the long term. This nurturing of relationships, whether they are new or sustained, is how social media can help the small business.

Unlike the large business which may have substantial resources for managing social media, the small firm may have few resources. Yet, the small firm may receive the best return on investment due to the scaling impact of social media. Thus, social media can greatly accelerate the relationship growth rate between customer and small firm which this book describes as being socially close.

For a full list of the authors honored at the event click HERE.

Event Highlights: Successful Women and how they Think about Business Differently

IMG_0254The other day we posted the full audio of our recent panel titled: “Successful Women and how they Think about Business Differently.” It’s a great listen and while we do recommend listening to the whole panel discussion we now also have video highlights from the event. Enjoy!

Event: Think Globally, Act Locally

The Department of Marketing and the Centers for Entrepreneurship and International Business would like to invite all of you to the “Think Globally, Act Locally: Building Local Roots for America’s Small Business” event. At this event you will get the opportunity to hear from Center for Entrepreneurship Director John Bradley Jackson and and Center for International Business Director Jeff Williamson.

This event will be held in the Titan Student Union Theatre on Wednesday, February 11 from 1pm to 2pm. Space for this event is limited so please make sure to RSVP to or you can also contact the Center for International Business at (657) 278-8264 or you can even visit their offices in SGMH 3357. Continue reading

Startups + Incubators = Good Sense

Vincent Yancoskie '10 - CSUF EntrepreneurshipFor many startups, joining an incubator can make good sense. Yet, incubators are not all alike; this requires the startup to do some homework and ask some basic questions.

The first question to address is for the startup itself. What type of help does your startup need? Most startups will answer this question saying that they need help finding investor capital. An infusion of cash may well help the fledgling business, but the “ask” of the investor can be a waste of time if the startup is not prepared for the “due diligence” process. Many seed investors have very specific requirements for their prospective startup investments. The list can include proof of concept, intellectual property, a full management team, documented customer development, prototypes, etc. My experience is that few startups have these essentials.

Readiness for funding is a key criterion for the startup looking for funding. The investors also want to see a “pitch” via PowerPoint, an executive summary, a business model canvas, and a business plan. Thus, this is how the incubator can help.

You need to ask the prospective incubator to describe what they do. Some incubators specialize by industry or category such as food, biotech, clean-tech, or even agriculture. Other incubators may be non-profit in nature and may focus on a geographic region with the hopes of local economic development and job creation. Still other incubators may have a decidedly aggressive investment posture with a trade of cash for a significant equity slice.

CSUF’s Startup Incubator is adjacent to the University in downtown Placentia. The Incubator provides promising and coach-able startups access to technical advice, assistance in the hunt for seed capital, a place to meet and work, a large network of veteran entrepreneurs, and expert guidance concerning patents, technology transfer, licensing, royalties, contracts, and new venture formation.

The CSUF Startup Incubator will function as a “hatchery” for innovation; the goal would be to commercialize resident startups within 180 days. Many traditional business incubators coddle new ventures and make money from renting the facility and providing professional services to them. In contrast, the CSUF Startup Incubator will aggressively challenge its residents to “succeed quickly or fail fast.” The Incubator will achieve this through stringent feasibility testing, thorough market research, verified proof of concept, and rigorous beta testing of products and services. An experienced team of content experts, innovators and entrepreneurs will optimize the commercialization process by helping innovators avoid mistakes and lost time.

Are you ready for this challenge? If so, you can learn more at Better yet, apply now!

John Bradley Jackson
Director, Center for Entrepreneurship
Professor, Entrepreneurship