Finance Internship Course Helps Students Launch Their Careers

The FIN 495 – Finance Internship course provides a combination of professional experience, faculty insight and student collaboration to build first-hand knowledge of the field. “We discuss the working environment, how the student’s work impacts the company, how to relate to their supervisor and co-workers, understanding the company culture, and how to exit the internship with the best career potential,” says Finance Lecturer Dick Huebner, who teaches the course.

The FIN 495 – Finance Internship course provides a combination of professional experience, faculty insight and student collaboration to build first-hand knowledge of the field. “We discuss the working environment, how the student’s work impacts the company, how to relate to their supervisor and co-workers, understanding the company culture, and how to exit the internship with the best career potential,” says Finance Lecturer Dick Huebner, who teaches the course.

For hundreds of Mihaylo finance majors, FIN 495 – Finance Internship has facilitated career development for students as they assist actual organizations and develop partnerships between the business college and the Southern California community.

For most finance students, internships are the key to developing the skills, experience and connections necessary for a successful and rewarding career in the industry. Mihaylo students receive academic credit for internships with organizations in Southern California and beyond through FIN 495, a course open to both undergraduate and graduate finance majors.

By developing a partnership between the university, organizations in the community, and students, the course relates to such high-impact practices as collaborative learning between students and external entities, experiences with complexity and diversity, and feedback on student activities.

Students fulfill at least 120 hours in the service of a company approved by CSUF’s Center for Internships and Community Engagement (CICE), which can be one’s current employer if it is in the appropriate field. Working with a site supervisor and Mihaylo Finance Lecturer Dick Huebner, students partake of a professional and academic experience that helps them maximize their exposure to the financial industry. At least junior standing, a 2.5 GPA and introductory finance course prerequisites are required to enroll.

Huebner and the course were recognized with this year’s Stewards of Place award at the CICE Community Engagement Awards on April 19 for incorporating high-impact practices, including the development of partnerships between students, faculty and the community.

Working in the Field and in the Classroom

“The course is structured to maximize the student’s experience in the workplace with a focus on learning as much as possible,” says Huebner. “We discuss the working environment, how the student’s work impacts the company, how to relate to their supervisor and co-workers, understanding the company culture, and how to exit the internship with the best career potential.”

Developing a career-focused understanding of finance is the goal of FIN 495. “The course is structured to maximize the student’s experience in the workplace with a focus on learning as much as possible,” says Huebner.

Developing a career-focused understanding of finance is the goal of FIN 495. “The course is structured to maximize the student’s experience in the workplace with a focus on learning as much as possible,” says Huebner.

With class sizes typically between six and eight students, the internship provides the personal attention necessary to fully develop as a professional, facilitating communication between students and with their instructor. Class meetings are held every other week, and there are several texts assigned throughout the semester to provide well-rounded career preparation.

Since its debut in summer 2012, students have completed internships for such entities as Deloitte, The Walt Disney Company, Miramontes Capital LLC, Fidelity Investments and Morgan Stanley, as well as organizations often not associated with finance, such as the Orange County Child Abuse Prevention Center and Peterson Law Group. A number of alumni now have careers with the organizations they interned with, including Jennifer Tran’16 (finance) and Kim Tu ’17 (finance), who both have positions with Deloitte.

Huebner has instructed the course since spring 2015. With nearly 40 years of private sector experience in administrative functions such as accounting, finance, human resources, ISDS and purchasing, he can speak from his extensive personal experience working in the business world.

For More Information

For more information on Mihaylo’s finance program, which equips students for opportunities in such fields as insurance, investments and real estate, visit the Department of Finance at SGMH 5113 or online.

About dcoats

I'm Daniel Coats, a CSU Fullerton Communications graduate student
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One Response to Finance Internship Course Helps Students Launch Their Careers

  1. A says:

    Kudos to Prof Huebner for a great job on this course!

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