Continuing America’s Preservation Legacy at National Parks

This blog post is the fifth and final in a weekly series throughout July examining opportunities in different sectors of America’s diverse economy.  

The Blue Ridge Parkway in the Southeast U.S. is America’s most visited national parkland.

The Blue Ridge Parkway in the Southeast U.S. is America’s most visited national parkland.

This summer marks the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, which administers America’s 411 national parklands in every state covering a total of 84 million acres. A number of career paths are available in the park service and related tourism.

“Laws change; people die; the land remains.” So said Abraham Lincoln, the United States’ 16th president. Ten years later, Union Civil War general-turned-president, Ulysses S. Grant, declared Yellowstone the world’s first national park.

As exploration and the conservation movements recognized numerous natural and historic treasures from coast to coast, Woodrow Wilson signed the National Park Service Organic Act on Aug. 25, 1916, establishing the agency within the Department of the Interior to oversee the nation’s irreplaceable parklands.

America’s Top Parks

The advent of the automobile and the growth of interstate highways during the 1950s made national parks and monuments accessible to millions of Americans and overseas visitors. More than 305 million people visited a U.S. national park area in 2015, a record approaching the nation’s total population, though many were international tourists or repeat visitors.

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Gianneschi Center Summer School Trains Organizations in Social Responsibility

Hearing from expert speakers and networking with fellow nonprofit professionals at the Gianneschi Center's Summer School is a great way to stay at the forefront of trends in the social responsibility sector.

Hearing from expert speakers and networking with fellow nonprofit professionals at the Gianneschi Center’s Summer School is a great way to stay at the forefront of trends in the social responsibility sector.

The 11th annual Summer School for Nonprofits will be held this summer from Aug. 15 to 18, providing instruction for local organizations on how to thrive in the contemporary economy.

Mihaylo’s Gianneschi Center for Nonprofit Research, which is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year, will host the annual Summer School for Nonprofits this August to equip local organizations to succeed in their mission to better the community. These organizations include nonprofits, social enterprises and socially-responsible for-profit companies, government agencies, and philanthropic foundations.

The Gianneschi 2016 Summer School for Nonprofits will feature instruction from more than 20 expert speakers on board development, regulatory issues, technology, fundraising, and volunteer recruitment and development. Attendees will expand their knowledge through one of three tracks: beginner, intermediate and advanced. Early-Bird Tuition is available through July 31. Individual tuition is $150, while up to four individuals in the same organization may attend for a combined rate of $300. Early-Bird Tuition includes free parking at the Fullerton Marriott  and a $10 Starbucks gift card. After July 31, registration increases to $175 for individuals and $350 for organizations, while parking will be $7 at the Marriott and $8 on-campus at the Eastside Parking Structure.

There will also be two free seminars, which are open free of charge, though registration is required. A Free Grant Seminar, hosted by the office of U.S. Rep. Ed Royce (R-Brea), discussing grant and proposal writing and federal programs for nonprofits, will be held on Aug. 17 from 1 to 4 p.m. at SGMH 1406. A Tax Seminar for Nonprofit and Exempt Organizations, sponsored by Vice Chair Diane Harkey of the California State Board of Equalization, will be held from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Aug. 18 at SGMH 1502.

Registration is available online. More information is available by contacting Susan Cadwallader, director of the Gianneschi Center for Nonprofit Research, at 657-278-7565 or email at scadwallader@fullerton.edu.

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Avoid a Plagiarism Scandal with These Five Tips

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In this era of Google and Wikipedia, plagiarism is a danger for university students. But a few tips can keep students out of trouble and even improve their grades. Photo from Pixabay. 

On the first night of the Republican National Convention last week, Melania Trump, wife of the GOP nominee, gave a speech including portions of language lifted from Michelle Obama’s 2008 Democratic National Convention speech. The controversy isn’t the first time that plagiarism has made political headlines. But repeating words that aren’t your own is a big issue for university students too. Here are five tips on how to avoid your own plagiarism scandal.

Melania Trump isn’t the first political figure to be accused of plagiarism. In 2003, then California Governor Gray Davis was charged with copying from Bill Clinton’s first State of the Union address. Senator Rand Paul, Russian President Vladimir Putin and even Vice President Joe Biden have been accused of copying the words of others at different times over the years.

In the digital age, plagiarism has become a major problem on university campuses, as students sometimes lift the words of others into their research papers and other academic work. Each year, students at the world’s top universities are expelled for stealing from the works of others. In some cases, alumni have even had their degrees revoked when it is determined that their theses were pirated.

“Plagiarism” comes from the Latin word plagiarius, which means “kidnapper.” Students need to quote and attribute referenced sources for most of their assignments. But when the reader is left to believe that the words are the author’s own, it is considered academic dishonesty and the penalties can be severe.

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From Wall Street to Main Street: A Look at Jobs in the Financial Sector

The New York Stock Exchange on Wall Street is the symbol of the American financial system. Image from Wikimedia Commons.

The New York Stock Exchange on Wall Street is the symbol of the American financial system. Image from Wikimedia Commons.

This blog post is the fourth in a weekly series throughout July examining opportunities in different sectors of America’s diverse economy.  

While the world economy has become more diverse in recent decades, all of the world’s 10 largest companies by market capitalization are still headquartered in the U.S., and Wall Street is still the hub of global financial markets. The American financial industry supports millions of jobs, including accounting, finance and management roles.

In the late 1700s, when traders began gathering under a buttonwood tree on Wall Street in Lower Manhattan to trade securities, no one could have imagined the importance the financial markets would have over the following centuries. The highs and lows of the global economy since 1900 have largely depended on the strength of the American financial sector.

The financial services industry in the U.S. accounted for 7% of the nation’s gross domestic product (GDP), or around $1.223 trillion in 2014. Nearly 6 million people work in this sector of the economy. The securities industry shows the greatest potential for employment growth, with a 12% increase in employment predicted by 2018.

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From Caviar Twinkies to Pig Races: A Look at This Year’s Orange County Fair

Carnival rides, live bands and exhibits of all kinds draw area residents and visitors alike to the Orange County Fair in Costa Mesa. Image from Wikimedia Commons.

Carnival rides, live bands and exhibits of all kinds draw area residents and visitors alike to the Orange County Fair in Costa Mesa. Image from Wikimedia Commons.

The annual Orange County Fair is going on now through Aug. 14. Here are seven things to do at the fair and some tips on how to save on admission and parking.

More than 1.3 million people attend the annual Orange County Fair in Costa Mesa, which is more than a third of the total population of the county. Last year, the fair made more than $23.1 million in sales. There’s plenty to do at the fair, from animal exhibits to concerts to edible creations. Here are seven things not to miss.

  1. Check Out the We Are One Exhibit

Projection mapping permits irregularly shaped objects to be transformed into a display surface for video projection. Visitors to the Orange County Fair will be able to experience this technology at the We are One exhibit, designed by creative and technical director John Mastri. On any day during the fair, stop by the Visual Arts Building to step into the four-sided area, where the faces of you and everyone else in the building will be turned to a video.

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